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CS6 Groundhog Day

Ah, here we go again. I already have this feeling that in one or two years I’m just gonna write a similar post about the then to be released CS7, but isn’t it amazing how predictably history repeats itself? You know, every time Adobe release a new version of their products, inevitably soon after forums are full of those insane posts. First, there’s the people who complain about the product not being available 5 minutes after midnight as if they could no longer bear working in their current version. Then there’s the other kind, who dutifully bought their upgrades (or were coaxed in doing so by those last minute offers) only to realize that their computers suck and they can’t use it. and then there’s of course the ones who were blinded by Adobe‘s marketing into thinking that those downloads would actually be available right away and those upgrades would work on the spot, only to find out that they got wrong serial numbers and the stinker that they call Adobe Download Assistant is still as unreliable as it ever was. Especially the latter puts some not so good light on their Creative Cloud promise of making your software available everywhere. Imagine being stuck with those issues while travelling and not even being able to call phone support. *booh* It’s funny how I’m already reading those forum posts and all those errors look all too familiar except for the version moniker having been incrmented by one. That shall be a few interesting weeks to come. To all the lucky ones who can get it working without a hitch: Happy CS6-ing, I guess!

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One comment on “CS6 Groundhog Day

  1. LOL, you must be crazy…Adobe Download Manager is the single best piece of soft to ever be conceived and written. It works absolutely flawlessly. Downloading and decompressing files just isn’t possible without it….

    Seriously though, wtf. I found it more annoying than ever. It’s also more tricky than ever to try to force a download without using their rubbish manager. It requires messing about with some validation cookie that I could never get working, so I decided to try their manager again. I assumed it would be better since the last time I used it, about two years ago.

    I was being lazy and only had ~ 6 gb free (after download completion). Instead of telling me how much space the downloaded file would take to decompress, it would just begin decompression, then give me an error about space. Okay, clean some stuff up…tell it to restart decompression…The ****ing the deletes the compressed file, so I have to re-download. The second time, I decided to decompress the file myself like I used to. With DLM open access is, of course, denied. Okay, close dlm so I can decompress the file an….****ing thing DELETES THE FILE AGAIN.

    I ended up downloading the same 6gb file 3 times that day. Just what the **** adobe, what the ****.

    I must say there’s quite a bit about cs6 I’m liking. Almost everything feels snappier. Although they still seem a little confused about threading programs without running actual separate processes, I’m still seeing nice gains form multi-core/frame rendering.

    The ray-trace engine is so incredibly slow I cannot believe it’s possible. Another place they COULD have both opencl and actual cuda (not opencl wrapped cuda) support fairly easily (I used vray RT on my amd with excellent results), instead they pulled some pure adobe **** and decided against it.

    PS opencl is extremely nice with a 6870.

    The macbook-only (for now) MPE opencl support is incredibly annoying and pisses me off to an extreme degree.
    What the hell would I do with a low-clock intel-based macbook anyways. Not much rather slowly, is what.

    The silly thing is that you can add radeons/firepros to the open_cl_supported_cards.txt in windows and 5770’s will work at least, haven’t been able to confirm any others yet.

    One thing I did read is that adobe had to sped lots of their time on these last versions dealing with apple “uniqueness” rubbish. They should just drop mac support, the mac children can sell their systems to FCPX users and use the proceeds to purchase and learn how to operate a real (and faster) computational device.

    Argh, rant. It’s not even half of it either.

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